Author: Adam Hughes

The Best Baseball Card from 1972 Was a Real Killer

(This is Day 13 of our series on the “Best Card From” each year, 1960-1989. Read all the entries here.) Harmon Killebrew was born in Payette, ID, in 1936. Eighteen years later, he made his Major League debut with the 1954 Washington Senators … at age 50. For visual evidence of this, take a quick gander at his 1955 Topps rookie card:     Seven years later, Killebrew — at age 50 — moved closer to home as the Senators became the Minnesota Twins before the 1961 season. Twenty years after that, Killebrew played in final last game, for the...

Read More

Collectors’ Ballot: Did the Hall of Fame Voters Get It Right with the Class of 2017?

The 2017 Hall of Fame induction ceremonies in Cooperstown, NY, are coming up during the weekend of July 28-30. By now, you know that the writers selected three men for enshrinement: Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines, and Ivan Rodriguez. But are those the right choices? We thought it would be fun to get the perspective of fellow card collectors — we’re the ones who have poured through these guys’ cards for decades, after all! So cast your ballot below, choosing up to 10 men who you think deserve a plaque in Cooperstown.  (Poll closes at 11:59:59 pm on July 31).  ...

Read More

How to Find Peace and Love with the 1971 Topps Vida Blue Baseball Card

(This is Day 12 of our series on the “Best Card From” each year, 1960-1989. Read all the entries here.) The 1982 Topps KMart set is a hunk of junk from a design standpoint, and it only gets worse when you throw in concepts like supply and demand. But that doesn’t mean it’s entirely without merit. In fact, the KMarts seem to come up as a topic of discussion on these pages fairly often, so I won’t bore you gory details here. Instead, let me just say that that ugly little boxed set featuring miniature pictures of old Topps cards...

Read More

The 1970 Topps Reggie Jackson — One Hot Dog, Hold the Mustard

(This is Day 11 of our series on the “Best Card From” each year, 1960-1989. Read all the entries here.) The 1970s Topps set is like chili or stew — it usually “tastes” best when served as a leftover. At first, all you see is a boring design with boring fonts and drab gray borders. It looks like something your local (amateur) card counterfeiter might put together in his garage on a Saturday afternoon because there is just no flair. Even the team name on each card front looks like an afterthought that was added on with a big, block-letter-printing typewriter....

Read More

7 Reasons Mickey Mantle’s Last Topps Card was the Best of 1969

(This is Day 10 of our series on the “Best Card From” each year, 1960-1989. Read all the entries here.) Some base sets just leave me so cold that it’s tough to justify picking any particular card as the best of the year. See 1968 for an example. But the 1969 Topps set has plenty to offer, including a clean design and clear, crisp photography. And it also has Mickey Mantle‘s last card. Here are seven reasons — I mean “7” reasons — why Mantle is Number 1 in ’69. It’s a Mickey Mantle Card First off, some disclosure —...

Read More

Never Miss a Post!

Wax Pack Gods on Facebook

Pin It on Pinterest